Easton Mako Hockey Sticks

Even if you’ve been playing the game for a while, choosing a stick can sometimes be a difficult task. It gets even more daunting when they have similar names. We’ll let you in on the differences between the sticks in the Easton Mako series.

Easton Mako II Grip Hockey Stick

easton-mako-II-grip-hockey-stickThe Mako II is a fully redesigned version of the Mako. The focus of this new model was to improve your handle of the game with an emphasis on the weight and balance of the stick. When you’re down to the seconds that count the most, the swiftness of this segmented core stick will really come in handy.

The micro bladder blade of this model decreases the overall weight and increases core compaction. With multi-rib blade construction and a textured shaft, the stick will be stiff, your shots will be more accurate, and you’ll have less vibration on the ice. Even in areas that are lacking blade tape, you’ll have a great puck spin with their non-skid blade coating. This particular model includes a grip coating that’s ideal if you’re looking to have better hand control.

Easton Mako II Composite Hockey Stick

easton-mako-II-comp-hockey-stickEverything you like about the Easton Mako II Grip Hockey Stick is here, but without the grip finish. Some players like to have a more firm handle on their stick, and the grip version is for them. For players that prefer the ability to slide their hands more easily when playing, this is the version for them.

 

 

Easton Mako M5 II Grip Hockey Stick

easton-mako-M5-II-grip-hockey-stickLooking to have quick hands and outsmart the goaltender? The Mako M5 Hockey Stick has the ability to do just that, and more importantly-you’ll be putting that puck in the net. A low kick point flex profile gives you a quick and accurate release when loaded. Similar to the Mako II line, the Mako M5 features the same micro-bladder blade process for a consistent accurate blade and the multi-rib construction blade that provides rigidity to reduce flutter during hard shots. You’ll be able to keep your hands locked in position, this textured stick has a grip finish.

Easton Mako M2 II Grip Hockey Stick

easton-mako-M2-II-grip-hockey-stickAnother older version on the Mako line is Easton’s Mako M2. Using composite technology, this stick is lightweight and easy to handle. As with the other versions mentioned, the M2 has a micro bladder blade for consistent blade wall thickness and a multi-rib blade that’ll make hard shots a breeze.

Unlike the newer models, this stick uses a 6K woven carbon paddle, while Mako II uses a 3K woven carbon paddle. Both will be durable, but the newer version will be more lightweight than this model.

Easton Mako M1 II Composite Hockey Stick

easton-mako-M1-II-comp-hockey-stickLook familiar? The Mako M1 hockey stick from Easton features a similar look to their top end Mako model. They constructed it using the same multi-rib blade to provide solid rigidity for shooting the puck. Because it is an entry level model, it also has a 6K woven carbon paddle rather than a 3K. The matte finish of this stick allows for you to slide your hands into position with the ease of a non-grip stick, but with a more firm hold. At less than half the price of the newest models, this stick is a great value.

Comments

  1. dakota says

    Just a quick question I have played both goal and wing but I have to choose one do you know any pros and cons I have equal skill in each thanks.

    • says

      Hi and thanks for the question. Playing goalie obviously is a much more expensive en-devour than being a player but the nice part about being a goalie is that you can usually play any time you want because players are always looking for goalies for drop in skates.
      It’s really a matter of preference so just decide which you enjoy more and go for it!

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